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Esophageal manometry
Esophageal manometry


Definition:

Esophageal manometry is a test to measure the pressure inside the lower part of the esophagus.



Alternative Names:

Esophageal motility studies; Esophageal function studies



How the test is performed:

When you swallow, muscles in your esophagus contract to help push food toward your stomach. Valves, or sphincters, inside the esophagus open to let food and liquid through, and then close to prevent food, fluids, and gastric acid from moving backward. The sphincter at the bottom of the esophagus is called the lower esophageal sphincter or LES.

During esophageal manometry, a thin, pressure-sensitive tube is passed through your mouth or nose and into your stomach. Once in place, the tube is pulled slowly back into your esophagus.

When the tube is in your esophagus, you will be asked to swallow. The pressure of the muscle contractions will be measured along several sections of the tube.

While the tube is in place, other studies of your esophagus may be done. The tube is removed after the tests are completed. The test takes about 1 hour.



How to prepare for the test:

You should not have anything to eat or drink for 8 hours before the test.



How the test will feel:

You may have a gagging sensation and some discomfort when the tube is put into place.



Why the test is performed:

The purpose of esophageal manometry is to see if the esophagus is contracting and relaxing properly. The test helps diagnose any swallowing problems. Your health care provider may request that this test be performed if you have symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).



Normal Values:

The LES pressure and muscle contractions are normal when you swallow.



What abnormal results mean:

Abnormal results may indicate the following:



What the risks are:

The tube in the esophagus may cause increased salivation , which raises your risk for aspiration . This can lead to lung injury or aspiration pneumonia .

In general, people with swallowing difficulty are at higher risk for aspiration.



Special considerations:



References: Wilson, J F. In the clinic. Gastroesophageal reflux disease. Ann Intern Med. 2008;149(3): ITC2-1-15; quiz ITC2-16


Review Date: 9/7/2008
Reviewed By: David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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