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Definition:

A hand x-ray is a medical image of one or both hands.



Alternative Names:

X-ray - hand



How the test is performed:

X-rays are a form of electromagnetic radiation like light, but of higher energy. They can pass through the body to form an image on film. Structures that are dense (such as bone) will appear white, air will be black, and other structures will be shades of gray.

A hand x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to place your hand on the x-ray table, and keep it very still as the picture is being taken. You may need to change the position of your hand, so additional images can be taken.



How to prepare for the test:

Inform the health care provider if you are pregnant. Remove all jewelry.



How the test will feel:

Generally, there is little or no discomfort associated with x-rays.



Why the test is performed:

Hand x-ray is used to detect fractures , tumors, or degenerative conditions of the hand. Hand x-rays may also be performed to assist in determining the "bone-age" of a child in order to determine if metabolic or nutritional disorders are interfering with proper growth.



Normal Values:



What abnormal results mean:

Abnormal results may include fractures, bone tumors , degenerative bone conditions, and osteomyelitis (inflammation of the bone caused by an infection).



What the risks are:

There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most experts feel that the risk is low compared with the benefits. Pregnant women and children are more sensitive to the risks of x-rays.



Special considerations:



References:

Mettler FA. Skeletal system. In: Mettler FA, Jr, ed. Mettler: Essentials of Radiology. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2005:chap 8.

Rogers LF, Talianovic MS, Boles CA. Skeletal trauma. In: Grainger RC, Allison D, Adam, Dixon AK, eds. Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging. 4th ed. New York, NY: Churchill Livingstone; 2001:chap 46.




Review Date: 8/11/2008
Reviewed By: Linda Vorvick, MD, Seattle Site Coordinator, Lecturer, Pathophysiology, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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