EspaƱol
ABOUT US | CONTACT | VOLUNTEER
MISSION & MINISTRY
Find a Physician
Decrease (-) Restore Default Increase (+)

Anatomical landmarks, front view
Anatomical landmarks, front view


Appendix
Appendix


Definition:

Abdominal point tenderness refers to the pain you feel when pressure is applied to a specific part of the belly area (abdomen).



Alternative Names:

Abdominal tenderness



Considerations:

The abdomen is an area of the body a doctor can easily examine by touch. The doctor can feel masses and organs within the belly area and pinpoint where you feel pain.

Abdominal tenderness can range from mild to severe. "Rebound" tenderness occurs when the tissue that lines the abdominal cavity (the peritoneum) is irritated, inflamed, or infected. See:Peritonitis



Common Causes:

Home Care:



Call your health care provider if:

Any person with point tenderness should call or present to an emergency room in order to be examined promptly by the health care provider!



What to expect at your health care provider's office:

Your health care provider will perform a physical exam, which includes gently pushing on areas of your abdomen. Persons with peritonitis will often tense the abdominal muscles when the area is touched by the doctor. This is called "guarding."

The doctor will note any point tenderness. This is a general term which means you have tenderness in a particular area.

For example, if you have appendicitis, you will likely have point tenderness when a specific part of your belly area is touched. This area is called McBurney's point.

The health care provider will also ask questions about your symptoms and medical history:

  • When did the symptoms develop?
  • Is this the first time you have had such discomfort?
  • If not, when does the discomfort tend to occur?
  • What other symptoms do you have? For example, do you have:

The following tests may be done:

In some cases, immediate surgery will be needed. This may involve an exploratory laparotomy or an emergency appendectomy .



References:

Proctor DD. Approach to the patient with gastrointestinal disease. In: Goldman L, Ausiello D, eds. Cecil Medicine. 23rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2007:chap 134.

Postier RG, Squires RA. Acute abdomen. In: Townsend CM, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery. 18th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2008:chap 45.




Review Date: 11/16/2008
Reviewed By: Linda Vorvick, MD, Family Physician, Seattle Site Coordinator, Lecturer, Pathophysiology, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
adam.com


About Us



Emanuel Cancer Centers 2013 Annual Report
Joint Notice of Privacy Practices
Accreditation & Quality Measures
Board of Directors
CEO's Message
Community Crisis Information
Maps & Directions
Mission & Ministry
News & Publications
Volunteer

Care & Services



Emanuel Physician Finder

Employees & Physicians



Tenet Application Process
e-MC Physician Portal
Web Mail
Employment Services
Physician Verification
Living in Turlock
Contact Us

Emanuel Medical Center
825 Delbon Avenue
Turlock, CA 95382
(209) 667-4200
Contact Us
© 2014 Emanuel Medical Center, Inc. All rights reserved
Home   |   Site Map   |   Joint Notice of Privacy Practices