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Vitiligo, drug induced
Vitiligo, drug induced


Vitiligo on the face
Vitiligo on the face


Incontinentia pigmenti on the leg
Incontinentia pigmenti on the leg


Incontinentia pigmenti on the leg
Incontinentia pigmenti on the leg


Hyperpigmentation 2
Hyperpigmentation 2


Post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation - calf
Post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation - calf


Hyperpigmentation w/malignancy
Hyperpigmentation w/malignancy


Post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation 2
Post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation 2


Definition:

Skin that has turned darker or lighter than normal is usually not a sign of a serious medical condition.

See also: Skin color, patchy



Alternative Names:

Hyperpigmentation; Hypopigmentation



Considerations:

Normal skin contains cells called melanocytes. These cells produce melanin , the substance that gives skin its color.

Skin with too much melanin is called hyperpigmented skin.

Skin with too little melanin is called hypopigmented skin.

Pale skin areas are due to too little melanin or underactive melanocytes. Darker areas of skin (or an area that tans more easily) occurs when you have more melanin or overactive melanocytes.

Bronzing of the skin may sometimes be mistaken for a suntan. This skin discoloration often develops slowly, starting at the elbows, knuckles, and knees and spreading from there. Bronzing may also be seen on the soles of the feet and the palms of the hands. The bronze color can range from light to dark (in fair-skinned people) with the degree of darkness due to the underlying cause.



Common Causes:
  • Prior skin inflammation (post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation)
  • Use of certain medicines
  • Endocrine diseases such as Addison's disease
  • Exposure to the sun
  • Vitiligo


Home Care:

Over-the-counter creams are available for lightening the skin. If you use these creams, follow instructions carefully and don't use one for more than 3 weeks at a time. Darker skin requires greater care when using these preparations. Cosmetics may also help cover a discoloration.

Avoid too much sun exposure. Always use sunscreen.

Abnormally dark skin may continue even after treatment. Experts recommend emotional support or counseling.



Call your health care provider if:

Call your doctor for an appointment if you have:

  • Skin discoloration that causes significant concern
  • Persistent, unexplained darkening or lightening of the skin
  • Any skin sore or lesion that changes shape, size, or color -- may be a sign of skin cancer


What to expect at your health care provider's office:

Your doctor will perform a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms, including:

  • When did the discoloration develop?
  • Did it develop suddenly?
  • Is it getting worse? How fast?
  • Has it spread to other parts of the body?
  • What medicines do you take?
  • Has anyone else in your family had a similar problem?
  • How often are you in the sun? Do you use a sun lamp or go to tanning salons?
  • What is your diet like?
  • What other symptoms do you have? For example, are there any rashes or skin lesions ?

Tests that may be done include:

Your doctor may recommend creams, ointments, surgery, or phototherapy, depending on the type of skin condition you have. The following articles offer more detailed treatment information.

Some skin color changes may return to normal without treatment.




Review Date: 4/13/2009
Reviewed By: Jonathan Kantor, M.D., North Florida Dermatology Associates, Jacksonville, FL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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