EspaƱol
ABOUT US | CONTACT | VOLUNTEER | WAYS TO GIVE
MISSION & MINISTRY
Find a Physician
Decrease (-) Restore Default Increase (+)

Lungs
Lungs


Definition:

Mediastinal tumors are growths that form in the area that separates the lungs. This area contains the heart, large blood vessels, windpipe (trachea), thymus gland, and connective tissues.



Alternative Names:

Thymoma - mediastinal; Lymphoma - mediastinal



Causes, incidence, and risk factors:

The mediastinum is the part of the chest that lies between the sternum and the spinal column, and between the lungs. It contains the esophagus, trachea, heart, and other important structures. The mediastinum is divided into three sections:

  • Anterior (front)
  • Middle
  • Posterior (back)

Mediastinal tumors are rare.

The most common location for tumors in the mediastinum depends on the age of the patient. In children, tumors are more common in the posterior mediastinum. These tumors often begin in the nerves and are non-cancerous (benign).

Most mediastinal tumors in adults occur in the anterior mediastinum and are usually cancerous (malignant) lymphomas or thymomas. These tumors are most common in people ages 30 - 50.



Symptoms:

Almost half of mediastinal tumors cause no symptoms and are found on a chest x-ray performed for another reason. Symptoms that do occur are due to pressure on (compression of) local structures and may include:



Signs and tests:

A medical history and physical examination may show:

Further testing may include:



Treatment:

Treatment for mediastinal tumors depends on the type of tumor.

  • For thymic cancers, surgery is the treatment of choice. It may be followed by radiation or chemotherapy, depending on the stage of the tumor and the success of the surgery.
  • For lymphomas, chemotherapy followed by radiation is the treatment of choice.
  • For neurogenic tumors of the posterior mediastinum, surgery is the treatment of choice.


Support Groups:



Expectations (prognosis):

The outcome depends on the type of tumor. Different tumors respond differently to chemotherapy and radiation.



Complications:

Complications of mediastinal tumors include:

  • Spinal cord compression
  • Spread to nearby structures such as the heart, lining around the heart (pericardium), and great vessels (aorta and vena cava)

Radiation, surgery, and chemotherapy can all have serious complications.



Calling your health care provider:

Call your health care provider if you notice symptoms of a mediastinal tumor.



Prevention:




Review Date: 9/13/2008
Reviewed By: Benjamin Medoff, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Pulmonary and Critical Care Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
adam.com


About Us



Emanuel Cancer Centers 2013 Annual Report
Joint Notice of Privacy Practices
Accreditation & Quality Measures
Board of Directors
CEO's Message
Community Crisis Information
Maps & Directions
Mission & Ministry
News & Publications
Volunteer

Care & Services



Emanuel Physician Finder

Employees & Physicians



Tenet Application Process
e-MC Physician Portal
Web Mail
Employment Services
Physician Verification
Living in Turlock
Contact Us

Emanuel Medical Center
825 Delbon Avenue
Turlock, CA 95382
(209) 667-4200
Contact Us
© 2014 Emanuel Medical Center, Inc. All rights reserved
Home   |   Site Map   |   Joint Notice of Privacy Practices