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Definition:

Melasma is a dark skin discoloration that appears on sun-exposed areas of the face.



Alternative Names:

Chloasma; Mask of pregnancy; Pregnancy mask



Causes, incidence, and risk factors:

Melasma is a very common skin disorder. Though it can affect anyone, young women with brownish skin tones are at greatest risk.

Melasma is often associated with the female hormones estrogen and progesterone. It is especially common in pregnant women, women who are taking birth control pills (oral contraceptives) and women taking hormone replacement therapy (HRT) during menopause.

Sun exposure is also a strong risk factor for melasma. The condition is particularly common in tropical climates.



Symptoms:

Melasma doesn't cause any other symptoms besides skin discoloration but may be of great cosmetic concern.

A uniform brown color is usually seen over the cheeks, forehead, nose, or upper lip. It is most often symmetrical (matching on both sides of the face).



Signs and tests:

Your health care provider can usually diagnose melasma based upon the appearance of your skin. A closer examination using a Wood's lamp may help guide your treatment.



Treatment:

Creams containing a combination of tretinoin, kojic acid, and azelaic acid have been shown to improve the appearance of melasma. Occasionally, your doctor may recommend chemical peels or topical steroid creams. In severe cases, laser treatments can be used to remove the dark pigment.

Avoiding the sun and using sunscreen are key to preventing melasma.



Support Groups:



Expectations (prognosis):

Melasma often fades over several months after stopping birth control pills or HRT, or after delivering a child. It may return with additional pregnancies or use of these medications.



Complications:



Calling your health care provider:

Call your health care provider if you have persistent darkening of your face.



Prevention:

Daily sunscreen use not only helps prevent melasma but is crucial in the prevention of skin cancer and wrinkles.




Review Date: 10/28/2008
Reviewed By: Michael Lehrer, M.D., Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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