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Definition:

Sepsis is a severe illness in which the bloodstream is overwhelmed by bacteria.



Alternative Names:

Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS)



Causes, incidence, and risk factors:

Sepsis is caused by a bacterial infection that can begin anywhere in the body. Common places where an infection might start include:

Sepsis may also accompany meningitis. In children, sepsis may accompany infection of the bone (osteomyelitis ). In hospitalized patients, common sites of infection include intravenous lines, surgical wounds, surgical drains, and sites of skin breakdown known as bedsores (decubitus ulcers).

The infection is often confirmed by a blood test. But, a blood test may not reveal infection in people who have been receiving antibiotics.

In sepsis, blood pressure drops, resulting in shock . Major organs and systems, including the kidneys, liver, lungs, and central nervous system, stop functioning normally.

A change in mental status and hyperventilation may be the earliest signs of sepsis coming on.

Sepsis is often life-threatening, especially in people with a weakened immune system or with other illness.



Symptoms:

Signs and tests:

The following may indicate sepsis:

  • Blood culture that reveals bacteria
  • Blood gases that reveal acidosis
  • Kidney function tests that are abnormal (early in the course of disease)
  • Platelet count that is lower than normal
  • White blood cell count that is lower or higher than normal

This disease may also change the normal results of the following tests:



Treatment:

People with sepsis usually need to be in an intensive care unit (ICU). As soon as sepsis is suspected, "broad spectrum" (able to destroy a wide array of bacteria) intravenous (directly in the vein) antibiotic therapy is begun.

The number of antibiotics may be decreased when blood tests reveal which particular bacteria are causing the infection. The source of the infection should be discovered, if possible. This could mean more testing. Infected intravenous lines or surgical drains should be removed, and any abscesses should be surgically drained.

Oxygen, intravenous fluids, and medications that increase blood pressure may be needed. Dialysis may be necessary if there is kidney failure, and a breathing machine (mechanical ventilation) if there is respiratory failure.



Support Groups:



Expectations (prognosis):

The death rate can be as high as 60% for people with underlying medical problems. The death rate is somewhat lower in those without other medical problems.



Complications:

Calling your health care provider:



Prevention: The risk of sepsis can be reduced, especially in children, by following the recommended immunization schedule.

References:

Enrione MA, Powell KR. Sepsis, septic shock, and systemic inflammatory response syndrome. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton BF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 18th Ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2007: chap 176.

Shapiro NI, Zimmer GD, Barkin AZ. Sepsis syndrome. In: Marx, JA, ed. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2006: chap 136.




Review Date: 9/28/2008
Reviewed By: Linda Vorvick, MD, Seattle Site Coordinator, Lecturer, Pathophysiology, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Washington School of Medicine; Jatin M. Vyas, MD, PhD, Instructor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Assistant in Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, Massachusetts General Hospital. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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