Español
ABOUT US | CONTACT | VOLUNTEER | WAYS TO GIVE
MISSION & MINISTRY
Find a Physician
Decrease (-) Restore Default Increase (+)

Blood cells
Blood cells


Definition:

Hyperviscosity of the newborn is the slowing and blockage of blood flow that results when there are too many red blood cells in an infant's blood.



Alternative Names:

Neonatal polycythemia



Causes, incidence, and risk factors:

Hyperviscosity can occur when the percentage of red blood cells (RBCs) in the infant's blood is greater than 65%. This may result from various conditions that develop before birth, such as:

  • Birth defects
  • Delay in clamping the umbilical cord
  • Inherited diseases
  • Not enough oxygen reaching body tissues (hypoxia)

The extra RBCs block the flow of blood in the smallest blood vessels. This leads to tissue death from lack of oxygen. This blocked blood flow can affect all organs, including the kidneys, lungs, and brain.



Symptoms:

Symptoms may include:



Signs and tests:

There may be signs of breathing problems, kidney failure, and newborn jaundice .

If the baby has symptoms of hyperviscosity, a blood test to count the number of red blood cells will be done. This test is called a hematocrit.

Other tests may include:

  • Blood gases to check oxygen level in the blood
  • Blood sugar (glucose) to check for low blood sugar
  • Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), a substance that forms when protein breaks down
  • Creatinine, a substance produced by muscles that can build up in the blood if the kidneys aren't working properly
  • Urinalysis


Treatment:

The baby will be monitored for complications of hyperviscosity. If needed, an exchange transfusion will be done to lower the amount of red blood cells that are moving through the baby's blood vessels.

Other treatment may include increasing body fluids.



Support Groups:



Expectations (prognosis):

The outlook is good for infants with mild hyperviscosity and those who receive treatment for severe hyperviscosity.

Some children may have mild changes in neurological development. Parents who believe their child may show any signs of developmental delay should contact their health care provider.



Complications:

Complications may include:

  • Death of intestinal tissue (necrotizing enterocolitis)
  • Decreased fine motor control
  • Kidney failure
  • Seizures
  • Strokes



Review Date: 9/26/2007
Reviewed By: Deirdre O’Reilly, MD, MPH, Neonatologist, Division of Newborn Medicine, Children’s Hospital Boston and Instructor in Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Review Provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
adam.com


About Us



Emanuel Cancer Centers 2013 Annual Report
Joint Notice of Privacy Practices
Accreditation & Quality Measures
Board of Directors
CEO's Message
Community Crisis Information
Maps & Directions
Mission & Ministry
News & Publications
Volunteer

Care & Services



Emanuel Physician Finder

Employees & Physicians



Tenet Application Process
e-MC Physician Portal
Web Mail
Employment Services
Physician Verification
Living in Turlock
Contact Us

Emanuel Medical Center
825 Delbon Avenue
Turlock, CA 95382
(209) 667-4200
Contact Us
© 2014 Emanuel Medical Center, Inc. All rights reserved
Home   |   Site Map   |   Joint Notice of Privacy Practices