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Digestive system organs
Digestive system organs


Definition:

Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a disorder often passed down through families (inherited) in which the person develops intestinal polyps and is at a significantly higher risk for developing certain cancers.



Alternative Names:

PJS



Causes, incidence, and risk factors:

It is unknown how many people are affected by PJS. However, the National Institutes of Health estimates that it affects about 1 in 25,000 to 300,000 births.

There are two types of PJS:

  • Familial PJS is due to a mutation in a gene called STK11. The genetic defect is passed down (inherited) through families as an autosomal dominant trait. That means if one of your parents has this type of PJS, you have a 50:50 chance of inheriting the bad gene.
  • Sporadic PJS is not passed down through families and appears unrelated to the STK11 gene mutation.


Symptoms:
  • Brownish or bluish-gray pigmented spots on the lips, gums, inner lining of the mouth, and skin
  • Clubbed fingers or toes
  • Cramping pain in the belly area
  • Dark freckles on and around the lips of a newborn
  • Blood in the stool that can be seen with the naked eye (occasionally)
  • Vomiting


Signs and tests:

A colonoscopy or flexible sigmoidoscopy shows intestinal polyps. The polyps develop most commonly in the small intestine, but also in the colon. An x-ray of the abdomen may also show polyps.

Additional exams may show:

Laboratory tests may include:



Treatment:

Surgery may be needed to remove polyps that cause long-term problems. Iron supplements help counteract blood loss.

Persons with this condition should be monitored by a health care provider and be checked periodically for cancerous polyp changes.



Expectations (prognosis):

There may be a significant risk of these polyps becoming cancerous. Some studies link PJS and cancers of the gastrointestinal tract, lung, breast, uterus, and ovaries.



Complications:
  • Intussusception (part of the intestine folds in on itself)
  • Polyps that lead to cancer
  • Ovarian cysts
  • Sex cord tumors


Calling your health care provider:

Call for an appointment with your health care provider if you or your baby have symptoms of this condition. Severe abdominal pain may be a sign of an emergency condition such as intussusception.



Prevention:

Genetic counseling is recommended if you are planning to have children and have a family history of this condition.



References:

Goldman L, Ausiello D. Cecil Textbook of Medicine. 23rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2007.




Review Date: 11/13/2007
Reviewed By: Christian Stone, M.D., Division of Gastroenterology, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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