EspaƱol
ABOUT US | CONTACT | VOLUNTEER
MISSION & MINISTRY
Find a Physician
Decrease (-) Restore Default Increase (+)

Campylobacter jejuni organism
Campylobacter jejuni organism


Digestive system
Digestive system


Digestive system organs
Digestive system organs


Definition:

Campylobacter enteritis is an infection of the small intestine with Campylobacter jejuni bacteria.



Alternative Names:

Food poisoning - campylobacter enteritis; Infectious diarrhea - campylobacter enteritis; Bacterial diarrhea



Causes, incidence, and risk factors:

Campylobacter enteritis is a common cause of intestinal infection . These bacteria also cause one of the many types of traveler's diarrhea.

People usually get infected by eating or drinking contaminated food or water, often raw poultry, fresh produce, or unpasteurized milk. A person can also be infected by close contact with infected people or animals. Symptoms start 2 - 4 days after exposure and generally last 1 week.

Risk factors include recent family infection with C. jejuni, recently eating improperly prepared food, or recent travel in an area with poor sanitation or cleanliness.



Symptoms:

Signs and tests:

Stool culture for Campylobacter jejuni.



Treatment:

The infection typically goes away on its own and is not usually treated with antibiotics. Severe symptoms may respond to treatment with antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin and azithromycin.

Self-care measures to avoid dehydration include drinking electrolyte solutions to replace the fluids lost with diarrhea. People with diarrhea, especially children, who are unable to take fluids by mouth because of nausea , may need medical attention and intravenous fluids.

People taking diuretics (water pills) need to be careful when they have diarrhea and may need to stop taking the medicine during the acute episode, if directed to do so by their health care provider.



Support Groups:



Expectations (prognosis):

Most people recover in 5-8 days.



Complications:

Immunosuppressed people with this condition are more vulnerable to sepsis , endocarditis , meningitis , and thrombophlebitis from the spread of the bacteria into their bloodstream.

Some patients will get a form of arthritis called Reiter's syndrome after a Campylobacter enteritis infection.

About 1 in 1,000 patients with campylobacter enteritis develop a nerve problem that results in paralysis, called Guillain-Barre syndrome . Paralysis associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome is usually temporary.



Calling your health care provider:

Call for an appointment with your health care provider if diarrhea comes back or continues for more than a week, or if there is blood in the stool .



Prevention:

Avoid improperly prepared foods and practice sanitary food preparation.



References:

Blaser MJ, Allos BM. Campylobacter jejuni and related species. In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, Dolin R, eds. Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier; 2005: chap 213.

Pigott DC. Foodborne illness. Emerg Med Clin North Am. 2008; 26(2):475-97.




Review Date: 11/14/2008
Reviewed By: Linda Vorvick, MD, Family Physician, Seattle Site Coordinator, Lecturer, Pathophysiology, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Washington School of Medicine; George F. Longstreth, MD, Department of Gastroenterology, Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program, San Diego, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
adam.com


About Us



Emanuel Cancer Centers 2013 Annual Report
Joint Notice of Privacy Practices
Accreditation & Quality Measures
Board of Directors
CEO's Message
Community Crisis Information
Maps & Directions
Mission & Ministry
News & Publications
Volunteer

Care & Services



Emanuel Physician Finder

Employees & Physicians



e-MC Physician Portal
Web Mail
Employment Services
Physician Verification
Living in Turlock
Contact Us

Emanuel Medical Center
825 Delbon Avenue
Turlock, CA 95382
(209) 667-4200
Contact Us
© 2014 Emanuel Medical Center, Inc. All rights reserved
Home   |   Site Map   |   Joint Notice of Privacy Practices