EspaƱol
ABOUT US | CONTACT | VOLUNTEER
MISSION & MINISTRY
Find a Physician
Decrease (-) Restore Default Increase (+)

Ptosis, drooping of the eyelid
Ptosis, drooping of the eyelid


Definition:

Ptosis is also called "drooping eyelid." It is caused by weakness of the muscle responsible for raising the eyelid, damage to the nerves that control those muscles, or looseness of the skin of the upper eyelids.



Alternative Names:

Drooping eyelids



Causes, incidence, and risk factors:

Drooping eyelid can be caused by the normal aging process, a congenital abnormality (present before birth), or the result of an injury or disease.

Risk factors include aging, diabetes , stroke , Horner syndrome , myasthenia gravis , and a brain tumor or other cancer , which can affect nerve or muscle reactions.



Symptoms:

Signs and tests:
  • A physical examination to determine the cause
  • Special tests may be done to evaluate suspected causes, such as myasthenia gravis


Treatment:

If an underlying disease is found, the treatment will be specific to that disease. Most cases of ptosis are associated with aging and there is no disease involved.

Surgery can be done to improve the appearance of the eyelids in milder cases if the patient wants it. In more severe cases, surgery may be necessary to correct interference with vision. In children with ptosis, surgery may be necessary to prevent amblyopia .



Support Groups:



Expectations (prognosis):

The expected outcome depends on the cause of the ptosis. Surgery is usually very successful in restoring appearance and function.



Complications:

If a drooping eyelid is left uncorrected in a child, it can lead to lazy eye.



Calling your health care provider:

Drooping eyelids in children require prompt evaluation by an ophthalmologist.

New or rapidly changing ptosis in adults requires prompt evaluation by an ophthalmologist.



Prevention:



References:

Custer PL. Blepharoptosis. In: Yanoff M, Duker JS, Augsburger JJ, Azar DT, eds. Ophthalmology. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Mosby Elsevier; 2004: sect 2, chap 86.

Olitsky SE, Hug D, Smith LP. Abnormalities of the Lids. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton BF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 18th Ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2007: chap 623.




Review Date: 7/17/2008
Reviewed By: Linda Vorvick, MD, Seattle Site Coordinator, Maternal & Child Health Lecturer, Pathophysiology, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
adam.com


About Us



Emanuel Cancer Centers 2013 Annual Report
Joint Notice of Privacy Practices
Accreditation & Quality Measures
Board of Directors
CEO's Message
Community Crisis Information
Maps & Directions
Mission & Ministry
News & Publications
Volunteer

Care & Services



Emanuel Physician Finder

Employees & Physicians



Tenet Application Process
e-MC Physician Portal
Web Mail
Employment Services
Physician Verification
Living in Turlock
Contact Us

Emanuel Medical Center
825 Delbon Avenue
Turlock, CA 95382
(209) 667-4200
Contact Us
© 2014 Emanuel Medical Center, Inc. All rights reserved
Home   |   Site Map   |   Joint Notice of Privacy Practices