EspaƱol
ABOUT US | CONTACT | VOLUNTEER | WAYS TO GIVE
MISSION & MINISTRY
Find a Physician
Decrease (-) Restore Default Increase (+)

Hookworm - mouth of the organism
Hookworm - mouth of the organism


Hookworm - close-up of the organism
Hookworm - close-up of the organism


Hookworm - Ancylostoma caninum
Hookworm - Ancylostoma caninum


Hookworm egg
Hookworm egg


Hookworm rhabditiform larva
Hookworm rhabditiform larva


Digestive system organs
Digestive system organs


Definition:

Hookworm is a roundworm infestation affecting the small intestine and lungs. The worms are about 1/2 inch long.



Causes, incidence, and risk factors:

The disorder is caused by infestation with the roundworms Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, Ancylostoma ceylanicum, or Ancylostoma braziliense. The first two occur in humans only. The last types also occur in animals.

Hookworm disease is widespread in the moist tropics and subtropics, and it affects over 1 billion people worldwide. In developing nations, the disease indirectly causes the death of many children by increasing their susceptibility to other infections that could normally be tolerated.

There is very little risk of contracting the disease in the U.S. because of advances in sanitation and control of wastes.

The larvae (immature form of the worm) penetrate the skin, where an itchy rash called ground itch may develop. The larvae migrate to the lungs via the bloodstream, enter the airways and cause coughing.

After traveling up the windpipe, the larva are swallowed. When the larvae are swallowed, they infect the small intestine and develop into adult worms. Adult worms and larvae are excreted in the feces.

Most people have no symptoms once the worms enter the intestines. However, iron deficiency anemia caused by loss of blood may result from heavy infestation.



Symptoms:

Note: There are often no symptoms.



Signs and tests:

Tests that can help diagnose the infection include:

This disease may also alter the results of a D-xylose absorption test.



Treatment:

The goals of treatment are to:

  • Cure the infection
  • Treat complications of anemia
  • Improve nutrition

Parasite-killing medications such as albendazole, mebendazole or, pyrantel pamoate are usually prescribed. Ivermectin, used for other worm infections, does not work for hookworm infections.

Symptoms and complications of anemia are treated as they arise. The doctor will likely recommend increasing the amount of protein in your diet .



Support Groups:



Expectations (prognosis):

Complete recovery occurs if treatment is given before serious complications develop. The infection is easily eradicated with treatment.



Complications:
  • Anemia
  • Severe protein loss with fluid build-up in the abdomen (ascites )
  • Other nutritional deficiencies


Calling your health care provider:

Call for an appointment with your health care provider if symptoms of hookworm infection develop.



Prevention:

Improvement in sanitation measures in developing countries is necessary for prevention of infection.



References:

Kazura JW. Nematode infections. In: Goldman L, Ausiello D, eds. Cecil Medicine. 23rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2007:chap 378.




Review Date: 9/28/2008
Reviewed By: Jatin M. Vyas, PHD, MD, Instructor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Assistant in Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, Massachusetts General Hospital. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
adam.com


About Us



Emanuel Cancer Centers 2013 Annual Report
Joint Notice of Privacy Practices
Accreditation & Quality Measures
Board of Directors
CEO's Message
Community Crisis Information
Maps & Directions
Mission & Ministry
News & Publications
Volunteer

Care & Services



Emanuel Physician Finder

Employees & Physicians



Tenet Application Process
e-MC Physician Portal
Web Mail
Employment Services
Physician Verification
Living in Turlock
Contact Us

Emanuel Medical Center
825 Delbon Avenue
Turlock, CA 95382
(209) 667-4200
Contact Us
© 2014 Emanuel Medical Center, Inc. All rights reserved
Home   |   Site Map   |   Joint Notice of Privacy Practices